SF Crowsnest Review

Very pleased (not to mention grateful) for the following review of my little science fiction book, Requiem For An Astronaut. 'I liked everything about this [book]. Bart is a perfect narrator with a calm, observant, slightly jaded point of view that doesn’t lapse into cheap cynicism. His style is relaxed and his musings reveal much … Continue reading SF Crowsnest Review

I Never Think Dark Will Come by Susan Jordan

My review of I Never Think Dark Will Come originally appeared in issue 63 of The Journal.Things abound in the first book by Susan Jordan, which takes as its focus the corporeal and tangible. 'Let us praise little things, the use we make of them,' Jordan declares in 'Laudemus' (the Latin for 'let us praise) … Continue reading I Never Think Dark Will Come by Susan Jordan

Operations of Water by Ian Seed

My review of Operations of Water originally appeared in issue 63 of The Journal. There's a famous story about the novelist Saul Bellow when, stuck in a rut with an unfinished novel, an American in Paris, he walked beside the Seine and became inspired by the freedom of the water. This relationship between the written … Continue reading Operations of Water by Ian Seed

Substantial Ghosts by Doreen Hinchcliffe

My review of Substantial Ghosts originally appeared in issue 61 of The Journal.The reader is offered an odd encounter towards the end of Doreen Hinchliffe's Substantial Ghost, her second collection after Dark Italics in 2017. In the poem, 'Twin', Hinchcliffe describes the narrator visiting an apparent twin's bedroom, after fifty years. ('Inseparable, we move and one, each/ Of … Continue reading Substantial Ghosts by Doreen Hinchcliffe

Home Turf by Ann Matthews

My review of Home Turf originally appeared in issue 61 of The Journal. Home Turf by Ann Matthews is, as poetry books go, a pleasing thing: a good cover, well designed, with a nice weight, shape and heft. And the thingness of the book is important, because Matthews's work is offering us a conceptual sense of … Continue reading Home Turf by Ann Matthews

London Grip Review: West South North, North South East

It's nice to end the year with something positive, and this very kind review of West South North, North South East by Mat Riches on London Grip is certainly that. It's probably the most perceptive review of this little book to date, and certainly the most involved. 'The title of this collection suggests a journey … Continue reading London Grip Review: West South North, North South East

On ‘Heredity/ASTYNOME’ by Naush Sabah

It's been a busy December, what with work, Christmas, and the ravages of the virus. I almost forgot that my review of Naush Sabah's ‘Heredity/ASTYNOME’ appeared on Wild Court a couple of weeks ago. 'If poetry ever had ‘must have’ purchases, then Naush Sabah’s debut release from Broken Sleep Books proved to be one of … Continue reading On ‘Heredity/ASTYNOME’ by Naush Sabah

The Aesthetics of Breath by Charles Lauder Jr

My review of Charles Lauder Jr's The Aesthetics of Breath has been published on The High Window. 'In some ways this manifold debut— taking in, as it does, historical figures, family lives, the problem of evil, and how an element of fantasy and danger is never far from our perception of those we treasure and … Continue reading The Aesthetics of Breath by Charles Lauder Jr

Her Lost Language by Jenny Mitchell

My review of Jenny Mitchell's debut collection, Her Lost Language, has been published by The High Window. 'In the age of social media, we’re accustomed to communicating when, perhaps, we don’t have much to say. Everyone does it; it’s the currency of our time. Probably, this has influenced the way we think of poetry, where … Continue reading Her Lost Language by Jenny Mitchell

Cuckoo by Nichola Deane

My review of Nichola Deane's poetry collection, Cuckoo, is online at London Grip. 'The main thing you notice about Cuckoo, Nichola Deane’s debut collection from V Press, is the names. The work teems with characters, from poets (Auden, Lorca, Ahkmatova, Edward Thomas), to artists (Klee, Cornell, Hockney) to politicians (Thatcher and Pinochet, somewhat gruesomely), to members … Continue reading Cuckoo by Nichola Deane